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Nathan Fillion talks about Joss Whedon at Dallas Comic Con | May 18, 2014

We look for jobs and when someone gives us one, that’s the role we choose. The one they gave us. It’s very very hard to work your way up in this system that is the entertainment industry. I used to work a lot. My first job was 3 years working everyday on a soap. I had more experience in 3 years than people do in 20. I had a lot of experience behind me, no one cared.

I used to knit and crochet. I walked on both sides of that [muffled]. And when I was a kid, because my mom did. But I haven’t picked up any needles in a long while except to stab people. My wife does. My wife rocks some seriously crocheting. She started out— she was already a knitter but she started out crocheting hats for a friend who was actually in chemo and suddenly needed a lot of hats. And then, she just sort of went wild with it. She knitted a turtle, and scarves, and a guitar strap for our son. She’s pretty fierce.
Joss Whedon (X)
Book Description
Drawing on the works of Shakespeare and American screenwriter Joss Whedon, this study in narrative ethics contends that Whedon is the Shakespeare of our time. The Bard wrote before the influence of the modern moral philosophers, while Whedon is writing in the postmodern period. It is argued that Whedon’s work is more in harmony with the early modern values of Shakespeare than with modern ethics, which trace their origin to 17th and 18th-century moral philosophy. This study includes a detailed discussion of representative works of Shakespeare and Whedon, showing how they can and should be read as forms of narrative ethics. (X)

Book Description

Drawing on the works of Shakespeare and American screenwriter Joss Whedon, this study in narrative ethics contends that Whedon is the Shakespeare of our time. The Bard wrote before the influence of the modern moral philosophers, while Whedon is writing in the postmodern period. It is argued that Whedon’s work is more in harmony with the early modern values of Shakespeare than with modern ethics, which trace their origin to 17th and 18th-century moral philosophy. This study includes a detailed discussion of representative works of Shakespeare and Whedon, showing how they can and should be read as forms of narrative ethics. (X)

It’s a very safe place, Joss’ house. He had started doing Shakespeare and included me in that and I guess maybe it started with me and other people and we just had a glorious time. He did Hamlet and it was fabulous. Joss just tried to make it funny. And I was reminded in some ways that Hamlet is like a standup comedian. That’s one of the ways that Shakespeare keeps it entertaining cause he knew he was going to have this one actor stand there and talk to the audience for long periods of time and one of the ways to do that is to make it funny. So seeing Joss as Hamlet was fabulous.
James Marsters (X)